YOUR OLD TOYS Messages in this topic - RSS

Crowman
Crowman
Posts: 161

4/25/2018

Crowman
Crowman
Posts: 161
If you could have a toy from your youth in it's original packaging today, what would it be?


I would be split between my Corgi Aston martin DB5 (Goldfinger) or my battery operated Stingray model I used to play with in the bath.


For those of you not up to speed with Stingray, it was a Gerry Anderson (Thunderbirds fame) TV show screened in the UK in 1964 and predated Thunderbirds.
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quinnspuddinjoker
quinnspuddinjoker
Posts: 656

4/25/2018

quinnspuddinjoker
quinnspuddinjoker
Posts: 656
My G.I. Joe headquarter and G.I. Joe submarine in boxes would be great. Still have both but no boxes.
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solarno
solarno
Posts: 156

4/25/2018

solarno
solarno
Posts: 156
I'm not sure I'd want any of the toys from my youth in boxes, because then I wouldn't have the memories of actually playing with them, and that's where the value lies for me. For the most part, the toys that meant the most to me I still have and I keep a lot of them on display as they represent who I am and where I've been. This means they are dusty or dirty, with yellowing plastic and peeling stickers, and in some cases broken. But I'd have them no other way. Below is a pic of some of my geeky childhood friends currently inhabiting my apartment. The Robotech/Transformers (Jetfire) toys seen here are all from their respective first runs and over 30 years old. Jetfire has a broken arm. The SDF-1 right side main cannon appendage is just resting. The Alpha fighter is missing it's gun and spring-launched missiles. The Cyclone barely visible on the right has broken attachment pins so accessories no longer attach. I am the original owner of these toys and they brought me countless hours of enjoyment playing with them. Re-enacting scenes, making up new ones, or in the case of articulated toys, just putting them in funny poses.




In general I've never been a fan of keeping things in boxes, kept separate from the world I live in. To me, toys in boxes are lifeless, emotionless artifacts. The fun and joy from them doesn't come into existence until you've touched them and figured out what they might do. Perhaps, flown them through imaginary space. Or have been driven through imaginary car chases on the living room floor. Or battled across an alien landscape created by messed up bedding.

If I received brand new versions of any of toys of my youth, the first thing I'd do is pull them out of the box, slap the stickers on, and play with them. Tell new stories with them, or better yet, have them battle their twin doppelgängers from the past. But most importantly, I'd have fun with them. 'Tis a difficult thing to do when they are trapped behind cello and cardboard.

Cheers!
Jim
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