(Paid Advertisement)

FAQs

The most common questions received from members

Comic Book Certification Service. An independent grader of comics.

Comic Guaranty Corporation. An independent grader of comics.

The original definition was a mock-up comic used by companies to copyright characters and logos that may be used in the future. The second definition is a small-sized - typically black and white - preview of a comic.

Stands for hard-cover.

A book written in the 1950s explaining that all juvenile deliquent activities were linked to comic books. Get the book, if you want a laugh.

Created in the 1950s as a guideline for what was acceptable for all ages in the comic books published.

To find out more on the comic code try : http://www.comics.dm.net/codetext.htm

Trade Paperbacks. These are collected reprints of selected comics issues.

Stands for soft-cover.

Officially begins with Showcase #4 released in 1956, and ends with 1969.

An inert, very hard, space-age plastic used to make high-quality protective sleeves and bags used to protect comics. Mylar is copyrighted by DuPont Company.

A comic book that contains a whole story in one issue.

The comics that are displayed on magazine and newsstand racks. Usually comes with a bar code.

The period beginning with Action Comics #1, published June 1938, and ending with World War II in 1945.

The period from 1980 to the present.

This word can be used to describe two different things. Pulp was the paper used when printing comics, but it was also a term to describe sci-fi, western, or action stories printed in "pulpwood magazines."

Can stand for a second or third printing of a comic, or a literal reprint of older comics.

The outer wrapping of a hard-cover book, to protect the luminated picture on the actual cover.

The inker goes over the penciller's boards, using ink pens and brushes. A good inker can improve sloppy boards; a mediocre inker can make brilliant boards look atrocious

A "themed" universe, not necessarily connected with the parent company. An example of this would be Wildstorm, which is an imprint of DC Comics.

A comic story that is reminiscent of a novel.

Our free account is perfect for browsing or if you're just starting your collection.

  • Free User Profile
  • Unlimited Buying
  • Post to Forums
  • Contact Members
  • View Shelf Pricing Only
  • 2 Live Classified Listings
  • Store up to 50 Books Online
  • No Sales Listings

For a full list of all membership levels and features, click here.

Please watch the following video for an overview of buying and selling on CPG.

To cancel your account, you must login and visit your Account Settings page. There, you will find a button to cancel your account and remove your credit card from our database.

If you have paid for a membership, your account will continue to be active until the end of your membership duration. We do not offer prorated refunds for unused membership time.

To cancel your subscription, you must login to PayPal and view your account. If you click on your current paypal total this will bring you to a "History" screen.

From here, you can use the drop down to view all of the subscriptions you have created with paypal. You want to "Show Subscriptions"

Once that has refreshed, each and every subscription you have will be displayed. Find the one for CPG and click the link.

The next page will give you the "Cancel Subscription" button.

This will not refund your current monthly billing cycle, but it will stop paypal from taking any further money from your account.

Also, your membership will not end until the date the current subscription actually ends.

It could take up to a half an hour for the response to come back from paypal to update your account. If it is taking longer than that please email comicguy@comicspriceguide.com and we will get it fixed right away.

However, if you paid with a eCheck via paypal. It could take up to a week for it to clear your bank and for paypal to send us the all clear.

To cancel your membership with CPG, you will need to do one of the following.

If you paid by Credit Card:
Go to your profile on the CPG site.

Under the membership tab, there will be a cancel button. Clicking this will stop reoccurring billing.

If you paid by PayPal
Log into PayPal and go to your subscriptions. Do a search for ComicsPriceGuide, you can cancel it from there and PayPal will not take anymore more money from your account.

Please watch this brief video to see how to manage your collection.

Free members can add up to 50 books, silver can add up to 300, and Gold Members can have unlimited books in their collection.

For more differences between levels, click here.

Collectors are familiar with the traditional long, white boxes known as "long boxes," which held hundreds of comics at a time and are great for storage.

In honor of those classic long boxes, we've created digital "boxes" to help you keep your collection organized.

Here's a brief video showing you how to manage your boxes.

Well, no.

As much as we want to, CPG does not purchase comics. But we do have plenty of members and advertisers that might! Consider adding your collection to CPG, then listing your books for sale or placing a classified ad.

This video will show you how to sell your collection on our site.

It's one of the most common questions on the ComicsPriceGuide.com message boards. So common in fact, that this article has been specifically written to help answer the question of "I have a signed comic, how much is it worth?"

So, your comic is signed...

Is the issue worth anything to begin with? The first step in understanding the value of signed copies is to determine what the issue you have is worth, unsigned. Identify your issue, grade it, then find out what the guide value is. Using our example comic, we search the CPG for Generic Super Hero Comic #1 and find that this particular issue is worth $5.00 in near mint condition. That's our starting point.

Who signed it?
Who does matter: pencilers/cover artists, creators, writers. Who doesn't matter: inkers, letterers, colors. There are exceptions to this rule. For one, Stan Lee. Stan the man Lee could sign a box of Pop-Tarts and it would be on eBay tomorrow. For another, having a comic signed by an inker or letterer isn't that bad, as long as one of the "does matters" signed it as well. Let's go to our Generic Super Hero Comic #1, signed by Buddy Artist, who drew the cover. We see our value inching up just a bit. But it's also signed by Jimmy Inker! Not a problem! As we had mentioned before, it's signed by one of the "does matters", so Jimmy Inker's sig is a welcome addition (this rule is out the window if the inking is done by a big name guest).

Ah, we're starting to see a little cash! Buddy Artist signed our book, guide value is $5.00, lookin' good...what do you mean can I prove that's Buddy Artist's signature?

Is it certified?
Scenario #1: Big Name Cover Artist signed your book at the 1985 Big Ass Comic Convention. Great. You saw him do it. Even better. You at least have your word to go hand in hand with your signed comic. Scenario #2: You bought a bunch of old comics from your cousin (the one trying to move out of his parent's basement), and one of them was signed by Big Name Penciler. Good. You can do a little research, compare some old signatures of Big Name Penciler you found on eBay, make the call that it is indeed a true signature. Then you can get a sheet of paper and your pen and try to copy the signature. You do it over and over until you realize...it can be done. And has been done many times. Not saying that yours is not a steadfast and true signature, just saying that it's a tough call on anybody's part. Scenario #3: Our copy of Generic Super Hero Comic #1 is distributed by Dynamic Forces, signed by Buddy Artist with a certificate of authenticity saying so. Cha-ching! The values of these babies are pretty easy to find, plus given the reputation of the DF Editions, it's money in the bank. But Dynamic Forces and Wizard haven't been around forever. That's why you have to make the best call you can on whether or not the signature you have is the genuine article. Odds are it is, but without the solid evidence from a reputable company, finding buyers is gonna be tough. If I sell a comic with a non-certified signature, I do not raise the price. I consider it a possible perk, but do not change the price from what I would normally sell it for.

Okay, where are we...Buddy Artist, as attested by Dynamic Forces, signed our comic that is worth a guide value of $5.00...

How much is it worth?
The old adage holds true: "it's only worth what someone is willing to pay for it." If you're trying to sell your signed comic, consider all the factors mentioned above and determine the estimated worth of your possession. You might also want to check the completed auctions on eBay and Yahoo to see if other items like yours have sold, and if so, for how much. When selling a signed comic, make sure the buyer understands that this is a signed comic. The buyers who are looking for such issues, or the one's who think this would be a great item to add to their collection are willing to pay more than guide value. Sometimes much more. But the ones who aren't may not be so happy to find that their new comic has been written on! If you're looking to keep it, just appreciate that you have a comic that's signed by one of the guys that make life fun. Value doesn't matter in this case.

Does a signature affect the grade of a comic?
It may, depending on the grading company and the condition of the book before it was signed. For example, a 10.0 book pre-signature could not be a 10.0 after someone signed it because.... well.... someone put ink all over it! Use the standard grading guides to grade your comic, and then note that it is signed. If you're getting your comic graded by CGC Comics or CBCS, they'll more than likely give it a qualified status; meaning that the comic is, for example, a 9.6, you'll get a Qualified 9.6 and the signature would be mentioned.

Above all, have fun with it.

Oh, I sold our Generic Super Hero Comic #1 for $10 to a guy who loves Buddy Artist.

Values from any pricing guide may not properly reflect the going rate in the area where you live. As a result, we cannot guarantee any of our prices on the market, nor would it be possible for us to accurately price absolutely every comic book for absolutely every sales transaction. Your comic book is worth what your best buyer is willing to pay you.

How We Do It
We average prices from sales and auctions online and around the world, and we factor in valuations from experts in different fields of the industry.

Use our guide to get a sense for market trends and baseline price, then negotiate or price your comic from there based on your own personal valuation of that book.

A professionally graded book from CGC, CBCS, or another reputable comic grading service has been professionally scrutinized over by quite industry experts. This book then has been carefully put in a protective container that will allow it to keep its grade for many decades to come.

For years, the market has determined that people will pay more for this guarantee of condition and therefore any graded book will be worth more to a potential buyer.

The graded values that are in the database do not reflect the cost of getting the book graded.

Upload Scan

If you see an issue without a scan, click on that issue number. You will see a link to upload a scan.

Once you upload it and it is approved, you will be able to see your contribution. CPG keeps track of how many scans each member uploads.

If you wish to upload personal scans of your issues, you may do so in your collection management. Select the book you wish to upload a cover for, and click the "Upload Cover Scan" icon. This feature is available for silver and gold members only at this time.

Upload Personal Scan

Good, that's what we want and need! Please report the missing issues using the form here.

But you will have to be patient. We will most likly get it entered in within the week if it is a valid entry. You may not get a reply post telling you that it has been entered either.

Most of the time yes. But there are the certain issues that defy that. If you have a variant that is not listed in CPG. Let us know and we will research it for you.

Although there is never a guarantee you will get more money for a graded book, it is more likely.

We recommend contacting the Comic Book Certification Service (CBCS).

Well to be perfectly honest, you will never get 100% of what the English versions of the comics go for. Most of the time it is between 30 to 60% of the condition value.

This is of course is true if the book happens to be published first in English and/or if you are trying to sell it in a Country that primarly buys English comics.

If the book was published in Germany and it was printing only in German then that is a different story.

Rarity:
Is how unusual or how easily replaced the comic might be. You will be less inclined to part with a rare book easily, and rarity increases value.

Singularity:
Is whether the seller has more than one copy. If it's your only copy of a particular comic, you might be less inclined to part with it easily.

Contribution:
Addresses how the comic fits into a collection. For example, do you have a full run of the title, or is this a Donald Duck book in a sea of Avengers? A book that is part of a run of comics makes a bigger contribution to the whole collection.

Sentiment:
Is that intangible quality that links you to your books, and comes from love of the artform. Sentiment is never an issue for comic speculators, only for collectors, or for people who have inherited comics from a loved one.

Marketability:
Looks at the potential buyers available for your comics. The Internet has changed many of the rules that dictate your market. Online auctions, e-classifieds, and other potential sales sites mean that your comics have a much better chance of finding a buyer today than ever before.

No.

Issue = The Book itself.
Volume = A Group of Books.

The issue number is the number of the book. This is found of the cover of the issue. There is usually only one issue of a certain number per volume (group)

The Volume is the number that is usually found in the indicia of the comic. The indicia can be found usually on the back of the cover, first or second page of the comic. The volume can contain many issues.

All scans must be in .JPG format. Please keep the size of the image below 500k if you can. Our system (if confirmed) will resize the image for the database.

It is just not feasible for us to track every currency from every country around the world. We suggest you find the price you want then try the The Universal Currency Converter.

Please report any missing publishers to our message board.

You can adjust your privacy settings by logging in and clicking here. We will never distribute your personal information.

Yes. Our cookies are used to verify your login information and remember your selections for certain UI elements of the pages.

Comic Book Store Locator

Don't let this happen to you. Try our new Comic Book Shop Locator service today!

CPG Comic Book Store Locator

CPG Partners

Our partners help make CPG possible.
We couldn't do it without them!

Become a Partner Today

(Paid Advertisement)

Warning: Your Internet Explorer is outdated and unsafe. This site features advanced technology that works best on modern web browsers. It's free to upgrade.
Warning: CPG works best with Javascript enabled. Some site features may be unavailable.